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dealing_with_hearing_loss [2018/10/13 16:43]
dealing_with_hearing_loss [2014/04/02 19:03] (current)
mfnamithd created
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 +Oddly enough, I have come to believe that losing my hearing was one of the best things that ever happened to me, because it resulted in the book of my first book. However it took some time for me to just accept that I was losing my hearing and needed help.
 +In my opinion that no matter how tough things get, you can make them better. I have my parents to thank for that. They never helped me to think that I could not accomplish something because of my hearing loss. Certainly one of my mother's favorite words when I expressed doubt that I could make a move was, "Yes, you can."
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 +I was born with a mild hearing loss but begun to drop more of my hearing when I was a senior in college. One day while sitting within my school dormitory room reading, I discovered my roommate pick it up, go to the telephone within our room, get up from her bed and begin talking. None of this could have appeared strange, except for one thing: I never heard the phone ring! I wondered why I could not hear a telephone that I could hear just the afternoon before. But I was too baffled--and embarrassed--to say something to my partner or to anyone else.
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 +Late-deafened people can always remember the moments when they first stopped being able to hear the considerations in real life telephones and doorbells calling, people speaking in the next room, or the television. It's kind of like remembering where you were when you learned that President Kennedy was shot or when you learned regarding the terror attack at the World Trade Center.
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 +Unbeknown to me in the time, that was just the beginning of my unpredictable manner, as my hearing grew steadily worse. But I was young and still vain enough to not want to obtain a hearing aid. I struggled through school by sitting up front in the classroom, straining to see lips and asking visitors to speak up, often again and again.
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 +From the time I entered graduate school, I can no longer delay. I knew that I had to get a hearing aid. By then, even sitting in front of the class wasn't helping much. I was still vain enough to attend a few months while I let my hair grow out a before taking the plunge but I ultimately did buy a hearing aid. It had been a big, clunky point, but I knew that I'd need to be ready to hear if I ever wanted to graduate.
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 +Soon, my hair size did not matter much, while the hearing aids got smaller and smaller. Learn further on our partner web page by visiting [[http://www.superpages.com/bp/Cleveland-OH/Physician-Hearing-Centers-L2445695402.htm|hearing test in cleveland]]. They also got better and better at picking up noise. The early aids did little more than make sounds louder evenly over the board. As we might have more hearing loss in the high frequencies than in-the lower ones, that will not benefit those of us with nerve deafness. Learn supplementary info on our favorite related article - Click here: [[http://www.citysearch.com/profile/658328190/cleveland_oh/physician_hearing_centers.html|relevant webpage]]. The newer electronic and programmable hearing aids go a way toward improving on that. They can be established to fit different types of hearing loss, so you can, say, increase a specific high-frequency more than other frequencies.
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 +Once I got my hearing aid and managed to listen to again, I could concentrate on other things that were important to me--like my knowledge, my job and writing that first book! I did not know it then, but that first hearing aid really freed me to take to bigger and better things. This poetic [[http://www.merchantcircle.com/business/Physician.Hearing.Centers.440-550-4179|the link]] article has uncountable pushing cautions for why to study this idea.
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 +I had long wanted writing a story, but like the others kept putting it off. It had been a chore merely to keep up at work, not to mention doing much else, as i began to drop more and more of my reading. Then after I got the hearing aid, I no longer had to worry about lots of the points I did before, and I begun to genuinely believe that writing a novel is the perfect activity for me. Anyone can produce no matter whether they can hear. I was also determined to prove that losing my hearing wouldn't carry me right back.
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 +My first book was published in 1994 and my fifth in the summer of 2005. As I have already been writing full-time for more than ten years, writing turned out to be much more than an interest. I am now hard at work on my first non-fiction work, a book to be published in 2007. I honestly think that I'd never have sat down at the computer and banged out that first book if I had maybe not lost so a lot of my reading. Alternatively, I had probably still be a manager somewhere and still dreaming about someday becoming a novelist. That is why I sometimes think that losing my hearing was one of the most readily useful things that actually happened to me.

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