Though people have been stuck on duct tape for years - deploying it for sets from short-term house repairs to creative trend fixes - advances in the tape world are now actually getting repair gurus out of even stickier situations.

Originally green and called “Duck” tape, this sort of tape was first utilized by soldiers in World War II for repairs and to keep moisture out of their ammunition cases. Following the war, it became called “duct tape,” when people began using it to connect heating and ac ductwork.

Duct tape was credited with preserving the lives of three NASA astronauts aboard Apollo 13, and now, the Department of Homeland Security suggested using duct tape with plastic to safeguard against bio-terrorism. A 2002 study showed that duct tape can even be used to take care of ugly warts.

While it will work for an instant fix, consumers realize that duct tape must be replaced frequently, specially on hard, porous or metallic surfaces. But one company recently increased this family addition by creating a record with a double-thick glue that sticks to wood, stucco, plaster, stone and metal.

Gorilla Tape, created by the organization that makes the popular Gorilla Glue, also has a distinctive webbing that makes it stronger than traditional duct tape but still easy to rip by hand, and an “all weather” cover that allows it to operate to the toughest things. Gorilla Tape includes a multitude of uses, from sealing leaky hoses to repairing broken lawn furniture to patching holes in convertible tops. To research more, consider checking out: www.creativesafetysupply.com/floor-marking-tapes site.

“The truth is that normal duct record does not work nicely until the top is perfectly clear and smooth - something we all know is seldom the case,” said Doug Roach, manager of product development for Gorilla Glue. “Gorilla Tape just sticks to things that common duct tape can't keep to.”

While duct tape is definitely a notable part of American history, recent developments ensure it is certain that the tape will carry on to be considered a part of everyone's toolboxes for decades ahead.
Though people have been caught on duct tape for years - deploying it for sets from short-term house repairs to innovative manner solutions - advances in the tape world are now actually getting repair gurus out of even stickier circumstances. Www.Creativesafetysupply.Com/Floor Marking Tapes Site includes more about the reason for it.

Initially green and called “Duck” tape, this kind of tape was used by soldiers in World War II for repairs and to keep water out of the ammunition cases. After the war, it became referred to as “duct tape,” when people started using it for connecting heat and ac ductwork.

Duct tape was credited with preserving the lives of three NASA astronauts aboard Apollo 13, and more recently, the Department of Homeland Security proposed using duct tape with plastic to safeguard against bio-terrorism. A 2002 study showed that duct tape could even be used to take care of unpleasant warts.

Although it is good for a fast fix, consumers find that duct tape has to be replaced often, especially on difficult, porous or metallic materials. But one company recently increased this household addition by developing a record with a double-thick adhesive that sticks to steel, stucco, plaster, stone and wood.

Gorilla Tape, created by the organization that makes the common Gorilla Glue, even offers a unique webbing that makes it more powerful than standard duct record but still easy to tear by hand, and an “all weather” shell that allows it to stand up to the toughest aspects. Gorilla Tape features a great number of uses, from closing leaky hoses to repairing broken lawn furniture to patching holes in convertible tops.

“The fact is that normal duct tape doesn't work nicely unless the top is perfectly clean and smooth - some thing all of us know is seldom the case,” said Doug Roach, manager of product development for Gorilla Glue. “Gorilla Tape only sticks to items that ordinary duct tape can not keep to.”

While duct tape is certainly a significant part of American history, recent developments ensure it is sure the tape will keep on to be described as a part of everyone's toolboxes for years in the future.

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